News & Perspective

May 08, 2009

May 08, 2009

H1N1 FLU BREAKING NEWS: Cases reach 2,500, Mexico's severe cases, concern about viral mixing, holding at phase 5

The World Health Organization (WHO) listed a global total of 2,500 confirmed cases of swine influenza H1N1 in 25 countries today. That total included 1,204 cases in Mexico, 896 cases in the United States (yesterday's number), 214 in Canada, 88 in Spain, and 34 in the United Kingdom. The death toll remains at 44, including 42 in Mexico and 2 in the United States. [WHO update 22]

Nov 11, 2008

Nov 11, 2008

US to give FAO $44 million for avian flu control

(CIDRAP News) – The United States will contribute another $44.4 million to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO's) campaign to prevent and control avian influenza, the FAO announced today.

Apr 22, 2008

Apr 22, 2008

HHS official reports on Southeast Asia issues

(CIDRAP News) – A US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) official today shared wrap-up perspectives on HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt's recent trip to Southeast Asia, which included discussions on virus-sharing and restrictions on the US Navy laboratory in Indonesia, updates on avian influenza collaborations, and talks on import safety.

Nov 15, 2007

Nov 15, 2007

THE PANDEMIC VACCINE PUZZLE Can we vaccinate enough people in time to matter?

Maryn McKennaContributing Writer

(CIDRAP News) – This in-depth article investigates the prospects for development of vaccines to head off the threat of an influenza pandemic posed by the H5N1 avian influenza virus. Its seven parts put advances in vaccine technology in perspective by illuminating the formidable barriers to producing an effective and widely usable vaccine in a short time frame.

Jun 09, 2006

Jun 09, 2006

Officials call Asia-Pacific pandemic drill a success

(CIDRAP News) – Australian officials who coordinated an exercise Jun 7 and 8 on pandemic influenza response among Asia-Pacific nations called the drill a success, according to an Agence France-Presse (AFP) story today.

Jan 21, 2005

Jan 21, 2005

Smuggled animals may bring disease

(CIDRAP News) – The next infectious disease to enter the United States might cross the border taped to a traveler's leg or tucked snugly under a tourist's hat.

Smuggling of wild animals has always posed hazards to human health, but the stakes may be getting higher today, given the role of animal hosts in lethal outbreaks such as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and avian influenza.

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