News & Perspective

Nov 10, 2017

Nov 10, 2017

ASP Scan (Weekly) for Nov 10, 2017

Antibiotics and subsequent sepsis
MCR surveillance in California
Community-related C diff
Antibiotic sparing for UTIs
More-resistant MDR-TB
MDR-TB in Minnesota
Strep burden, resistance threat

Apr 18, 2020

Apr 18, 2020
Florida swab

US COVID-19 total tops 700,000; cases spike in Russia, parts of Asia

New testing studies reveal more about spread in some US communities, and overseas, cases rose steadily in many countries, especially Russia and Japan.

Mar 31, 2009

Mar 31, 2009

H5N1 virus may be adapting to pigs in Indonesia

(CIDRAP News) – Scientists report that H5N1 avian influenza viruses may be adapting to pigs, as evidenced by the finding that H5N1 viruses isolated from pigs in Indonesia were less harmful to mice than were H5N1 viruses from chickens.

Dec 14, 2007

Dec 14, 2007

Players in H5N1's debut ponder a decade's lessons

(CIDRAP News) – Dr. Keiji Fukuda still remembers the intense emotions that tumbled through his mind as he waited to board his hastily scheduled flight out of Atlanta. His destination was Asia. In Hong Kong, a newly identified avian influenza virus, recently dubbed H5N1, was making people desperately ill.

Sep 02, 2005

Sep 02, 2005

Hurricane Katrina sparks fears of disease outbreaks

(CIDRAP News) – Amid the devastation left by hurricane Katrina on the US Gulf Coast, fears of infectious disease outbreaks have added to the distress. Some of those concerns are solidly grounded, while others are less so, disease experts say.

Jul 29, 2005

Jul 29, 2005

Russian birds have H5N1; 2 more deaths in Vietnam

Editor's note: This story was revised July 31 to clarify information about previous reports of H5N1 influenza viruses in Russia.

(CIDRAP News) – News services said today the avian influenza outbreak reported last week in Russia involves the dangerous H5N1 strain, while two more fatal human cases of the illness were reported in Vietnam.

Jan 21, 2005

Jan 21, 2005

Smuggled animals may bring disease

(CIDRAP News) – The next infectious disease to enter the United States might cross the border taped to a traveler's leg or tucked snugly under a tourist's hat.

Smuggling of wild animals has always posed hazards to human health, but the stakes may be getting higher today, given the role of animal hosts in lethal outbreaks such as SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) and avian influenza.

Newsletter Sign-up

Get CIDRAP news and other free newsletters.

Sign up now»

OUR UNDERWRITERS

Unrestricted financial support provided by

Bentson Foundation Unorthodox Philanthropy logo and text 'Leading Underwriter'3M logoGilead 
Grant support for ASP provided by



bioMérieux

  Become an underwriter»